Archive for the 4. Fourth Series (2011) Category

No. 43, Yule (December 2011)

Posted in 4. Fourth Series (2011) on January 27, 2012 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

No. 42, Concrete Poetry (November 2011)

Posted in 4. Fourth Series (2011) on November 1, 2011 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

Please click on link to download the issue (No. 42, Concrete Poetry)

Table of Contents

  1.           Rabelais, The Divine Bottle (1564)

  2.           Herbert, The Altar (1633)

  3.           Herbert, Easter Wings (1633)

  4.           Herrick, The Pillar of Fame (1648)

  5.           Carroll, The Mouse’s Tale (1865)

  6.           Apollinaire, Heart, Crown and Mirror (1914)

  7.           Apollinaire, It’s Raining (1918)

  8.           Schwitters, Cigarette (1921)

  9.           Schwitters, Z A (elemental) (1922)

10.           Schwitters, Poem 25 (1922)

11.           Schwitters, Pay (poem for two voices) (1927)

12.           Ray, Sound Poem (1924)

13.           Cummings, r-p-o-p-h-e-s-s-a-g-r (1932)

14.           Cummings, l(a (1958)

15.           Gomringer, Silence (1954)

16.           Gomringer, Wind (1960)

17.           Gomringer, Tree Wind (1960)

18.           Belloli, Water (1961)

19.           Belloli, Sun (1967)

20.           Bremer, The Text That Remains (1964)

21.           Bremer, Always Good to Stay in Line (1966)

22.           Finlay, Acrobats (1964)

23.           Finlay, Ajar (1964)

24.           Williams, Sense / Sound (1955)

25.           Williams, Like Attracts Like (1958)

26.           Williams, bcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz (1958)

27.           Williams, a (1958)

28.           Williams, Meditation, no. 1 (1958)

29.           Williams, Meditation, no. 2 (1958)

30.           Williams, 120 Love Letters (1962)

31.           Williams, Do You Remember (1966)

32.           Williams, kurt schwitters (1987)

33.           Rühm, Crossing – Homage to Kurt Schwitters (1987)

34.           Elmer, geraldine dening (2011)

35.           Dening, The Tower – Homage to Tatlin (2011)

36.           Note

Concrete poetry reduces language to its basic elements, forming the poem from the interrelation between individual phonemes, from one or two words designating either the most concrete of objects or the most abstract of concepts, or from common phrases repeated until they become meaningless. These are the building blocks of language, but the forms they make on the page do not imitate either natural or man-made objects; rather, they are the visual demonstration of the structure of the poem, which is both model and example. A concrete poem is a system for the generation of the text that forms it, a machine for making concrete poems. But it places the making of the poem under the agency of language itself, rather than the subject who speaks it. Thus, each poem is both the presentation of that system and the poem which that system creates.

No. 41, Merz (October 2011)

Posted in 4. Fourth Series (2011) on October 3, 2011 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

Please click on link to download the issue (No. 41, Merz)

Table of Contents

  1.           Schwitters reciting his Ursonata, London (1944)

  2.           Schwitters, Sonata in Ursounds (1927)

  3.           Hausmann, fmsbwtözäu (1918)

  4.           Schwitters, Ursonata, Prelude (1922-32)

  5.           Schwitters, ABCD (1923)

  6.           Schwitters, Ursonata, First movement: Rondo (1922-32)

  7.           Schwitters, Merz 601 (1923)

  8.           Schwitters, Ursonata, Second Movement: Largo (1922-32)

  9.           Schwitters, Merz Construction (1923)

10.           Schwitters, Ursonata, Third Movement: Scherzo (1922-32)

11.           Schwitters, Merz 1924, 1 (1924)

12.           Schwitters, Ursonata, Fourth Movement: Presto

13.           Schwitters, Merz, Elikan (1925)

14.           Schwitters: Ursonata, Cadenza (1922-32)

16.           Schwitters, Merz, Oorlog (1930)

16.           Schwitters, Ursonata, Finale (1922-32)

17.           Schwitters and Van Doesburg, Kleine Dada Soirée (1923)

18.           Note

The use of ordinary script with the letters of the old Roman alphabet can only give a very partial suggestion of the performed Sonata. As is the case with any system of notation, many interpretations are possible. And as with any act of reading, imagination is required to read correctly. The reader himself has to work seriously if he wishes to become a genuine reader. It is work, rather than questions or mindless criticism, that improves the reader’s receptivity. The right to criticize is reserved for those who have understood everything.

– Kurt Schwitters

No. 39-40, Dada (August-September 2011)

Posted in 4. Fourth Series (2011) on August 30, 2011 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

Please click on link to download the issue (No. 39-40, Dada)

Table of Contents

  1.           Note for the Bourgeois

                AVANT DADA (1914-16)

  2.           The Futurists in Paris (1912)

  3.           Guillaume Apollinaire wounded in the war (1916)

  4.           Apollinaire, The New Spirit and Poets (1917)

  5.           Apollinaire, Heart, Crown and Mirror (1914)

  6.           Carrà, Free Word Painting (1914)

  7.           Marinetti, Manifesto of Futurist Literature (1912)

  8.           Marinetti, Mountain + Valley + Road x Joffre (1915)

  9.           Picabia, Portrait of a Young American Girl (1915)

10.           Zayas, Woman! (1915)

                ZURICH DADA (1916-1919)

11.           Arp, Tzara and Richter, Zurich (1917)

12.           Hugo Ball at the Cabaret Voltaire (1916)

13.           Ball, Flight Out of Time (1927)

14.           Ball, gadj beri bimba (1916)

15.           Täuber, Dance costumes (1916)

16.           Ball, Karawane (1916)

17.           Richter, Hennings with Dada-doll (1916)

18.           Hennings, Maybe the Last Flight (1916)

19.           Janco, Cabaret Voltaire (1916)

20.           Tzara, The Admiral Looks for a House to Rent (1916)

21.           Janco, Portrait of Tristan Tzara (1919)

22.           Tzara, Manifesto of Monsieur Antipyrine (1916)

23.           Huelsenbeck, End of the World (1916)

24.           Albert-Birot, Mechanical Razor (1917)

25.           Arp, Collage arranged according to the Laws of Chance (1916)

26.           Arp, Terrestrial Forms (1917)

27            Tzara, Dada Manifesto 1918 (1918)

28.           Picabia, Alarm Clock (1919)

                BERLIN DADA (1918-1920)

29.           Opening of International Dada Fair, Berlin (1920)

30.           Höch, Cut with the Kitchen Knife Dada (1919)

31.           Huelsenbeck, Dadaistic Manifesto (1920)

32.           Hausmann, fmsbw (1918)

33.           Hausmann, OFF (1918)

34.           Sander, Raoul Hausmann (1929)

35.           Hausmann, kp’erioUM (1919)

36.           Preiss, Wooden-puppet-dance (1920)

37.           Huelsenbeck, What is Dada? (1919)

38.           Hannah Höch with her Dada-doll (1925)

39.           Huelsenbeck, En Avant Dada (1920)

40.           Baader, Honorary Portrait of Charlie Chaplin (1919)

                PARIS DADA (1919-1921)

41.           Paris Dada (1921)

42.           Ernst, Dadamax (1920)

43.           Breton, The Mystery Corset (1919)

44.           Duchamp, L.H.O.O.Q. (1919)

45.           Aragon, Manifesto of the Dada Movement (1920)

46.           Picabia, Still Lives (1920)

47.           Picabia, Dada Manifesto (1920)

48.           Breton with Picabia Poster (1920)

49.           Picabia, The Holy Virgin (1920)

50.           Tzara, Dada Manifesto on Feeble Love and Bitter Love (1920)

51.           Picabia, Portrait of Tristan Tzara (1919)

                HANOVER DADA (1919-1932)

52.           Schwitters, Merzhouse (1919-1933)

53.           Schwitters, Merz collage (1919)

54.           Schwitters, Sonata (1923)

55.           Schwitters, Note to Ursonata (1944)

56.           Schwitters, Ursonata (1932)

57.           Schwitters performing the Ursonata (1944)

                APRÉS DADA (1922-24)

58.           Constructivist-Dadaist Conference, Weimar (1922)

59.           Man Ray, Tristan Tzara (1922)

60.           Tzara, Conference on Dada (1922)

61.           Tzara, Colonial Syllogism (1924)

Dada’s targets were the reason and rationality driving the philosophies and technologies of the machine age, which it attacked with the weapons of its fathers: poetry and painting, music and dance, literature and theatre, exposing them as the camouflage of a civilization gone mad – and worse, as the cultural trenches through which men walked in straight lines into the gun-smoke and the barbed-wire. By a relentless assault on the conventions of language, Dada hoped to prise open a gap between the materiality of the sign and its transparency to meaning – into which it introduced the possibility of a new language for new thoughts. Dada’s favourite medium, therefore, was the human voice, raised in protest, in poem and manifesto, above the cannon and chatter of the bourgeoisie as they sat around conference and dining tables, planning the cull of a generation.

No. 38, Bog Poems (July 2011)

Posted in 4. Fourth Series (2011) on July 31, 2011 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

Please click on link to download the issue (No. 38, Bog Poems)

Table of Contents

01.     Grauballe bog, Jutland

02.     Tacitus, Germania (c. 98 A.D.)

  I.     BOGLANDS (1969/1972)

03.     The Tollund man (c. 400 B.C.)

04.     Heaney, Bogland (1969)

05.     Heaney, The Tollund Man (1972)

06.     Heaney, Nerthus (1972)

 II.     BOG POEMS (1975)

07.     First photograph of a Danish bog man (1892)

08.     Heaney, Bone Dreams (1975)

09.     Haraldskjaer bog, Jutland

10.     Heaney, Come to the Bower (1975)

11.     Heaney, Bog Queen (1975)

12.     Head of the Windeby girl (c. 100 A.D.)

13.     Heaney, Punishment (1975)

14.     Hand of the Grauballe man (c. 290 B.C.)

15.     Heaney, The Grauballe Man (1975)

16.     Head of the Roum girl (c. 400 B.C.)

17.     Heaney, Tête Coupée (1975)

18.     Huldre bog, Jutland

19.     Heaney, Kinship (1975)

20.     Chariot in Rappendam Fen (c. 100 A.D.)

21.     Heaney, Belderg (1975)

III.     RETURN TO TOLLUND (1996/2006)

22.     Path to Tollund bog, Jutland

23.     Heaney, Tollund (1996)

24.     Head of the Tollund man (c. 400 B.C.)

25.     Heaney, The Tollund Man in Springtime (2006)

26.     Note

27.     The goddess Nerthus (500-350 B.C.)

28.     The Broddenbjerg god (500-350 B.C.)

One can see in this Iron-age festival the sovereignty for which both Irish political struggle and Heaney’s own labour as a poet aimed. If his response to the plea that did not stifle its rage was to offer emblems of its adversity, their goal is a similar cessation of hostilities and the restoration of a unified and independent Ireland under the guardianship of the goddess. The ‘springtime’ of the Tollund man to which Heaney refers in the last of his bog poems is the time in which the body of the victim, containing its last meal of grain and seeds, would germinate in the bog, thereby renewing the cycle of life for the community. Poetry is that festival, and its celebration here looks forward to the Irish Spring.

No. 37, The Rural Muse (June 2011)

Posted in 4. Fourth Series (2011) on July 8, 2011 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

Please click on link to download the issue (No. 37, The Rural Muse)

Table of Contents

I.      HELPSTONE, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE (1793-1832)

01.     Clare, The Progress of Rhyme (1827-32)

02.     Clare, Sudden Shower (1827-32)

03.     Clare, The Hail Storm in June 1831 (1831)

04.     Clare, Shadows of Taste (1827-32)

05.     Clare, The Fallen Elm (1831)

06.     Clare, Midsummer (1827-32)

07.     Clare, Decay (1827-32)

II.     NORTHBOROUGH, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE (1832-1837)

08.     Clare, To the Snipe (1832)

09.     Clare, The Lament of Swordy Well (1832)

10.     Clare, The Thresher (1836-37)

11.     Clare, The Badger (1836-37)

12.     Clare, On Trespass (1836-37)

13.     Clare, The Prisoner (1836-37)

III.    HIGH BEECH ASYLUM, EPPING FOREST (1837-1841)

14.     Clare, London versus Epping Forest (1837-41)

15.     Clare, The Gypsy Camp (1837-41)

IV.     NORTHBOROUGH, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE (1841)

16.     Clare, Journey out of Essex (1841)

V.      ST. ANDREW’S ASYLUM, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE (1841-1864)

17.     Clare, A Vision (1844)

18.     Clare, Come Hither (1844-45)

19.     Clare, I Am (1844-45)

20.     Note

The journey of his revolt, which is that of his life, follows Clare from the enforced labour of his birthright into the voluntary labour of writing; his subsequent refusal to submit even this activity to any end other than itself, even that of publication; to, finally, a hermetic retirement from the world into a mystical vision of existence. If this journey – as it did Hölderlin, Nerval, Nietzsche, Van Gogh and Artaud – ultimately cost Clare his sanity, this does not in any way lessen the courage and strength of his decision to pursue its path. On the contrary – and as the lives of these and other travellers on its path testify – madness is only one, and not the greatest, of the sacrifices man is lead to make by that form of sacrifice we call poetry.

No. 36, End Times (March 2011)

Posted in 4. Fourth Series (2011) on March 17, 2011 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

Please click on link to download the issue (No. 36, End Times)

Table of Contents

01.     Kate Tempest performing (2009)

02.     Tempest, End Times (2009)

03.     Tempest, Cannibal Kids (2009)

04.     Tempest, Revelation (2009)

05.     Tempest, Best Intentions (2009)

06.     Tempest, Give (2011)

07.     Tempest, Renegade (2011)

08.     Tempest, Hell is Empty (2011)

09.     Tempest, Line in the Sand (2011)

10.     Note

Poetry, real poetry, doesn’t need silence in order to be heard, a clear page on which to be written, a comfortable seat and a willing audience to listen. Poetry contains all the conditions of its hearing within itself, its own space and the warmth to heat it. You don’t need a chair when the words lift you off your feet, a call for silence when you can hear a pin drop, or the willingness to listen when your ear has become that of the crowd, when the words catch fire on the breath of the speaker, and in a transmutation of matter into spirit, the sounds with which we communicate our most mundane needs to each other burst, instead, into tongues of fire, leaping from the quiet air and setting it aflame with words branded in your memory, locked in your heart, that you carry about with you and reach for when groping in the dark.