Archive for the 2. Second Series (2009) Category

No. 21, The Winter Solstice (December 2009)

Posted in 2. Second Series (2009) on April 13, 2010 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

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Table of contents

01.   Neolithic Man, Winter Festival (c. 4000-3000 B.C.)

02.   Graves, The White Goddess (1948)

03.   Directions

04.   Communion

05.   Forest canopy, Loughton Camp

06.   Crowley, Aha! (1919)

07.   Lightning-struck beech tree, Loughton Camp

08.   Graves, To Juan at the Winter Solstice (1945)

09.   Yule log, Loughton Camp

10.   Auden, Death’s Echo (1936)

11.   Birch sapling, Loughton Camp

12.   Note

Just as the life of the deciduous oak, during the barren winter months, was held to reside in the evergreen mistletoe that grew from its trunk, so the life of the sun, during the days of its death, was contained in the Yule log until the sun was reborn for another year, and once again began its year-long journey across the heavens. The Yule log, therefore, is both the embodiment of the sun and the spirit of vegetation, and its sacrifice the ritual act that renews the cycle of life for the community.

No. 20, The Waste Land (November 2009)

Posted in 2. Second Series (2009) on April 13, 2010 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

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Table of contents

1.   Wren, Saint Magnus Martyr (1676)

2.   Eliot, I. The Burial of the Dead (1922)

3.   Eliot, II. A Game of Chess (1922)

4.   Eliot, III. The Fire Sermon (1922)

5.   Eliot, IV. Death by Water (1922)

6.   Eliot, V. What the Thunder Said (1922)

7.   Rennie, London Bridge (1831)

‘Mrs Susanna Chambers by her last will & testament bearing date 28th December 1640 gave the sum of Twenty-Two shillings and sixpence yearly for a Sermon to be preached on the 12th day of February in every Year within the Church of St. Magnus, in commemoration of God’s merciful preservation of the said Church of St. Magnus from Ruin by the late & terrible Fire on London Bridge.’

– Church of Saint Magnus Martyr

No. 19, Mystical Experience (October 2009)

Posted in 2. Second Series (2009) on April 13, 2010 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

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Table of contents

01.   The Buddha, Ādittapariyāya Sutta (c. 400 B.C.)

02.   Pseudo Dionysius, Theologia Mystica (475-525)

03.   Blessed Angela of Foligno, Memoriale (1292-1296)

04.   Bernini, L’Estasi di Santa Térésa d’Ávila (1645-52)

05.   Saint Teresa of Ávila, El Libro de la Vida (1557-1565)

06.   San Juan de la Cruz, Visión de Cristo Crucificó (1574-77)

07.   San Juan de la Cruz, Un éxtasis de harta contemplación (1577-78)

08.   Blake, The Ancient of Days (1794)

09.   Blake, Auguries of Innocence (1803)

10.   Brontë, The Prisoner (1845)

11.   Nerval, Letter to Victor Loubens (1841)

12.   Nietzsche, Ecce Homo (1888)

13.   Régnard, Extase avec attitude de crucifixion (c. 1896)

14.   Madeleine, Journal (1896-1904)

15.   Crowley, The Magician in his robe (1929)

16.   Crowley, Aha! (1919)

17.   Eliot, East Coker (1940)

18.   Huxley, The Doors of Perception (1954)

19.   Bataille, La Souveraineté (1954)

20.   Note

Whether it is the epiphany of a forest walk, the visions accompanying altered states of consciousness, the intoxication and ecstasy of dancing, a sublime sentiment of the divine essence, or a drug-induced descent to the edge of consciousness, all mystical experience has a common origin in that instant in which the symbolic sphere in which we live out our imaginary relation to the world is shattered, and the muteness of a suddenly alien reality flows into the bowl of consciousness, flooding it.

No. 18, Madame Edwarda (September 2009)

Posted in 2. Second Series (2009) on April 13, 2010 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

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Table of contents

1.   Bataille, Préface de Madame Edwarda (1956)

2.   Bellmer, Madame Edwarda (1966)

3.   Bataille, Madame Edwarda (1941)

4.   Bellmer, Madame Edwarda (1966)

5.   Atget, Porte Saint-Denis (c. 1920)

6.   Note

‘If you’re afraid of everything, read this book but listen to me first: if you laugh, it’s because you are afraid. A book, you think, is something inert. That’s possible. And yet what if, as is the case, you do not know how to read? Would you begin to doubt . . . ? Are you alone? Do you shake with the cold? Do you know to what point man is ‘yourself’? A fool and naked?’

– Georges Bataille

No. 17, Eroticism (August 2009)

Posted in 2. Second Series (2009) on April 13, 2010 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

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Table of contents

01.   Elmer/Harrison, Arse, no. 1 (2008)

02.   Elmer/Harrison, Arse, no. 2 (2008)

03.   Elmer/Harrison, Arse, no. 3 (2009)

04.   Elmer/Harrison, Arse, no. 4 (2009)

05.   Elmer/Harrison, Hip, no. 1(2009)

06.   Elmer/Harrison, Back, no. 1 (2009)

07.   Elmer/Harrison, Back, no. 2 (2009)

08.   Elmer/Harrison, Torso, no. 1 (2009)

09.   Elmer/Harrison, Torso, no. 2 (2009)

10.   Elmer/Harrison, Torso, no. 3 (2009)

11.   Elmer/Harrison, Hand (2009)

12.   Elmer/Harrison, Back, no. 3 (2009)

13.   Elmer/Harrison, Hip, no. 2 (2009)

14.   Elmer/Harrison, Legs, no. 2 (2009)

15.   Elmer/Harrison, Legs, no. 3 (2009)

16.   Elmer/Harrison, Feet, no. 1 (2009)

17.   Elmer/Harrison, Feet, no. 2 (2009)

18.   Elmer/Harrison, Legs, no. 1 (2007)

19.   Note

What ultimately distinguishes eroticism from the sexual instinct of animals is that the pleasure it pursues is not subordinate to the reproduction of the species. Indeed, insofar as it diverts the sexual instinct from a purely reproductive end, human sexuality, by definition and in the fullest sense of the word, is perverted from which the absence of any foundation, beyond the contingencies of power, for designating any form of sexual activity as either natural or deviant, as for or against nature.

Special edition, The Libertines (July 2009)

Posted in 2. Second Series (2009) on April 13, 2010 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

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Contents

01.   Doherty/Barât, What a Waster (2002)

02.   Doherty/Barât, Up the Bracket (September 2002)

03.   Doherty/Barât, Up the Bracket (October 2002)

04.   Doherty/Barât, Time for Heroes (2003)

05.   Doherty/Barât, Don’t Look Back into the Sun (2003)

06.   Doherty/Barât, Can’t Stand Me Now (2004)

07.   Doherty/Barât, The Libertines (2004)

08.   Doherty/Barât, What Became of the Likely Lads (2004)

09.   Sade, La Philosophie dans le boudoir (1795)

10.   Discography

‘Voluptuaries of all ages, of every sex, to you alone do I offer this work: nourish yourselves upon its principles they favour your passions, and these passions, which cold and insipid moralists have put you in fear of, are merely the means employed by nature to bring man onto the path she prescribes for him; listen only to these delicious passions, for only their voice can lead you to happiness.’

– Marquis de Sade

No. 16, The Society of the Friends of Crime (May 2009)

Posted in 2. Second Series (2009) on April 13, 2010 by thesorcerersapprenticeonline

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Table of Contents 

  1.       Man Ray, Portrait imaginaire de D. A. F. Sade (1938)

  2.       Sade, ‘Statutes’, L’Histoire de Juliette (1797)

  3.       Masson, Justine de Sade (1928)

  4.       Bellmer, Pour Sade (1947)

  5.       Sade, ‘Oath’, L’Histoire de Juliette (1797)

  6.       Sade, ‘Instructions’, L’Histoire de Juliette (1797)

  7.       Masson, Justine de Sade (1928)

  8.       Note

The Society of the Friends of Crime sets itself up as a secret society in opposition to the social order of the State – in which, nevertheless, it continues to exist according to its own, stringent statutes and laws, which define and ensure the existence of a utopian, ideal world within the dystopian reality of the world beyond its borders.