No. 42, Concrete Poetry (November 2011)

Please click on link to download the issue (No. 42, Concrete Poetry)

Table of Contents

  1.           Rabelais, The Divine Bottle (1564)

  2.           Herbert, The Altar (1633)

  3.           Herbert, Easter Wings (1633)

  4.           Herrick, The Pillar of Fame (1648)

  5.           Carroll, The Mouse’s Tale (1865)

  6.           Apollinaire, Heart, Crown and Mirror (1914)

  7.           Apollinaire, It’s Raining (1918)

  8.           Schwitters, Cigarette (1921)

  9.           Schwitters, Z A (elemental) (1922)

10.           Schwitters, Poem 25 (1922)

11.           Schwitters, Pay (poem for two voices) (1927)

12.           Ray, Sound Poem (1924)

13.           Cummings, r-p-o-p-h-e-s-s-a-g-r (1932)

14.           Cummings, l(a (1958)

15.           Gomringer, Silence (1954)

16.           Gomringer, Wind (1960)

17.           Gomringer, Tree Wind (1960)

18.           Belloli, Water (1961)

19.           Belloli, Sun (1967)

20.           Bremer, The Text That Remains (1964)

21.           Bremer, Always Good to Stay in Line (1966)

22.           Finlay, Acrobats (1964)

23.           Finlay, Ajar (1964)

24.           Williams, Sense / Sound (1955)

25.           Williams, Like Attracts Like (1958)

26.           Williams, bcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz (1958)

27.           Williams, a (1958)

28.           Williams, Meditation, no. 1 (1958)

29.           Williams, Meditation, no. 2 (1958)

30.           Williams, 120 Love Letters (1962)

31.           Williams, Do You Remember (1966)

32.           Williams, kurt schwitters (1987)

33.           Rühm, Crossing – Homage to Kurt Schwitters (1987)

34.           Elmer, geraldine dening (2011)

35.           Dening, The Tower – Homage to Tatlin (2011)

36.           Note

Concrete poetry reduces language to its basic elements, forming the poem from the interrelation between individual phonemes, from one or two words designating either the most concrete of objects or the most abstract of concepts, or from common phrases repeated until they become meaningless. These are the building blocks of language, but the forms they make on the page do not imitate either natural or man-made objects; rather, they are the visual demonstration of the structure of the poem, which is both model and example. A concrete poem is a system for the generation of the text that forms it, a machine for making concrete poems. But it places the making of the poem under the agency of language itself, rather than the subject who speaks it. Thus, each poem is both the presentation of that system and the poem which that system creates.

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