No. 39-40, Dada (August-September 2011)

Please click on link to download the issue (No. 39-40, Dada)

Table of Contents

  1.           Note for the Bourgeois

                AVANT DADA (1914-16)

  2.           The Futurists in Paris (1912)

  3.           Guillaume Apollinaire wounded in the war (1916)

  4.           Apollinaire, The New Spirit and Poets (1917)

  5.           Apollinaire, Heart, Crown and Mirror (1914)

  6.           Carrà, Free Word Painting (1914)

  7.           Marinetti, Manifesto of Futurist Literature (1912)

  8.           Marinetti, Mountain + Valley + Road x Joffre (1915)

  9.           Picabia, Portrait of a Young American Girl (1915)

10.           Zayas, Woman! (1915)

                ZURICH DADA (1916-1919)

11.           Arp, Tzara and Richter, Zurich (1917)

12.           Hugo Ball at the Cabaret Voltaire (1916)

13.           Ball, Flight Out of Time (1927)

14.           Ball, gadj beri bimba (1916)

15.           Täuber, Dance costumes (1916)

16.           Ball, Karawane (1916)

17.           Richter, Hennings with Dada-doll (1916)

18.           Hennings, Maybe the Last Flight (1916)

19.           Janco, Cabaret Voltaire (1916)

20.           Tzara, The Admiral Looks for a House to Rent (1916)

21.           Janco, Portrait of Tristan Tzara (1919)

22.           Tzara, Manifesto of Monsieur Antipyrine (1916)

23.           Huelsenbeck, End of the World (1916)

24.           Albert-Birot, Mechanical Razor (1917)

25.           Arp, Collage arranged according to the Laws of Chance (1916)

26.           Arp, Terrestrial Forms (1917)

27            Tzara, Dada Manifesto 1918 (1918)

28.           Picabia, Alarm Clock (1919)

                BERLIN DADA (1918-1920)

29.           Opening of International Dada Fair, Berlin (1920)

30.           Höch, Cut with the Kitchen Knife Dada (1919)

31.           Huelsenbeck, Dadaistic Manifesto (1920)

32.           Hausmann, fmsbw (1918)

33.           Hausmann, OFF (1918)

34.           Sander, Raoul Hausmann (1929)

35.           Hausmann, kp’erioUM (1919)

36.           Preiss, Wooden-puppet-dance (1920)

37.           Huelsenbeck, What is Dada? (1919)

38.           Hannah Höch with her Dada-doll (1925)

39.           Huelsenbeck, En Avant Dada (1920)

40.           Baader, Honorary Portrait of Charlie Chaplin (1919)

                PARIS DADA (1919-1921)

41.           Paris Dada (1921)

42.           Ernst, Dadamax (1920)

43.           Breton, The Mystery Corset (1919)

44.           Duchamp, L.H.O.O.Q. (1919)

45.           Aragon, Manifesto of the Dada Movement (1920)

46.           Picabia, Still Lives (1920)

47.           Picabia, Dada Manifesto (1920)

48.           Breton with Picabia Poster (1920)

49.           Picabia, The Holy Virgin (1920)

50.           Tzara, Dada Manifesto on Feeble Love and Bitter Love (1920)

51.           Picabia, Portrait of Tristan Tzara (1919)

                HANOVER DADA (1919-1932)

52.           Schwitters, Merzhouse (1919-1933)

53.           Schwitters, Merz collage (1919)

54.           Schwitters, Sonata (1923)

55.           Schwitters, Note to Ursonata (1944)

56.           Schwitters, Ursonata (1932)

57.           Schwitters performing the Ursonata (1944)

                APRÉS DADA (1922-24)

58.           Constructivist-Dadaist Conference, Weimar (1922)

59.           Man Ray, Tristan Tzara (1922)

60.           Tzara, Conference on Dada (1922)

61.           Tzara, Colonial Syllogism (1924)

Dada’s targets were the reason and rationality driving the philosophies and technologies of the machine age, which it attacked with the weapons of its fathers: poetry and painting, music and dance, literature and theatre, exposing them as the camouflage of a civilization gone mad – and worse, as the cultural trenches through which men walked in straight lines into the gun-smoke and the barbed-wire. By a relentless assault on the conventions of language, Dada hoped to prise open a gap between the materiality of the sign and its transparency to meaning – into which it introduced the possibility of a new language for new thoughts. Dada’s favourite medium, therefore, was the human voice, raised in protest, in poem and manifesto, above the cannon and chatter of the bourgeoisie as they sat around conference and dining tables, planning the cull of a generation.

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