No. 37, The Rural Muse (June 2011)

Please click on link to download the issue (No. 37, The Rural Muse)

Table of Contents

I.      HELPSTONE, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE (1793-1832)

01.     Clare, The Progress of Rhyme (1827-32)

02.     Clare, Sudden Shower (1827-32)

03.     Clare, The Hail Storm in June 1831 (1831)

04.     Clare, Shadows of Taste (1827-32)

05.     Clare, The Fallen Elm (1831)

06.     Clare, Midsummer (1827-32)

07.     Clare, Decay (1827-32)

II.     NORTHBOROUGH, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE (1832-1837)

08.     Clare, To the Snipe (1832)

09.     Clare, The Lament of Swordy Well (1832)

10.     Clare, The Thresher (1836-37)

11.     Clare, The Badger (1836-37)

12.     Clare, On Trespass (1836-37)

13.     Clare, The Prisoner (1836-37)

III.    HIGH BEECH ASYLUM, EPPING FOREST (1837-1841)

14.     Clare, London versus Epping Forest (1837-41)

15.     Clare, The Gypsy Camp (1837-41)

IV.     NORTHBOROUGH, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE (1841)

16.     Clare, Journey out of Essex (1841)

V.      ST. ANDREW’S ASYLUM, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE (1841-1864)

17.     Clare, A Vision (1844)

18.     Clare, Come Hither (1844-45)

19.     Clare, I Am (1844-45)

20.     Note

The journey of his revolt, which is that of his life, follows Clare from the enforced labour of his birthright into the voluntary labour of writing; his subsequent refusal to submit even this activity to any end other than itself, even that of publication; to, finally, a hermetic retirement from the world into a mystical vision of existence. If this journey – as it did Hölderlin, Nerval, Nietzsche, Van Gogh and Artaud – ultimately cost Clare his sanity, this does not in any way lessen the courage and strength of his decision to pursue its path. On the contrary – and as the lives of these and other travellers on its path testify – madness is only one, and not the greatest, of the sacrifices man is lead to make by that form of sacrifice we call poetry.

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