No. 32, The Celtic Twilight (November 2010)

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Table of Contents

I. CELTIC MYSTERIES (1886-1903)

01.     Yeats, To Ireland in the Coming Times (1893)

02.     Yeats, A Poet to his Beloved (1895)

03.     Yeats, He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven (1899)

04.     Yeats, Adam’s Curse (May 1901)

II. IRISH POLITICS (1904-1921)

05.     Yeats, Easter 1916 (September 1916)

06.     Yeats, The Second Coming (January 1919)

07.     Yeats, A Prayer for my Daughter (June 1919)

08.     Yeats, Nineteen Hundred and Nineteen (Sept 1921)

III. MODERN MYSTICISM (1922-1939)

09.     Yeats, The Tower (October 1925)

10.     Yeats, Among School Children (June 1926)

11.     Yeats, Sailing to Byzantium (September 1926)

12.     Yeats, Death (September 1927)

13.     Yeats, A Dialogue of Self and Soul (December 1927)

14.     Yeats, Byzantium (September 1930)

15.     Yeats, Coole and Ballylee, 1931 (February 1931)

16.     Yeats, The Choice (February 1931)

17.     Yeats, Lapis Lazuli (July 1936)

18.     Yeats, Long-legged Fly (April 1938)

19.     Yeats, Under Ben Bulben (September 1938)

20.     Note

Running through Yeats’ poetry is the landscape of his homeland: the town of Sligo in which he spent the summer holidays of his childhood, and the City of Dublin in which he lived as an adult; the seven woods of Coole Park in which his patroness, Lady Gregory, had her home, and the Norman tower of Thoor Ballylee which he purchased in 1917; the churchyard in the village of Drumcliffe in which he would be buried, and the mountain of Ben Bulben that looms over it. This is the landscape of his thought, the concrete images of abstract, ideal forms whose spirits speak to him down the centuries through the medium of his poetry.

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One Response to “No. 32, The Celtic Twilight (November 2010)”

  1. There was a cock strutting about the graveyard when I went to see his chosen spot. Bright red, imperious. We slept in the dunes by the sea, the booming of the Atlantic sounding all night.

    To Yeats!

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